sciencecenter:

The next great frontier of undiscovered species: your house!
Much fanfare is placed on the discovery of new flora and fauna - exotic birds, funky reptiles, bizarre insects - but very little energy is invested in discovering new bacterial life. In fact, the average household probably contains more unknown species than any nature preserve.
That’s exactly what Rob Dunn and his team of ecologists at NCSU are attempting to show in their innovative new study, announced in late August. In places like urban apartments, Dunn is hoping to discover “a who’s who of evolutionary miracle stories.” He’s soliciting ten households from each state - 5 rural, 5 urban - to sample their houses and send the kits back for analysis. The team will then let you know what you’ve been living with, as well as post the results online (anonymously, don’t worry).
Want to get involved? Check out the project website. Hurry - first come, first served!

sciencecenter:

The next great frontier of undiscovered species: your house!

Much fanfare is placed on the discovery of new flora and fauna - exotic birds, funky reptiles, bizarre insects - but very little energy is invested in discovering new bacterial life. In fact, the average household probably contains more unknown species than any nature preserve.

That’s exactly what Rob Dunn and his team of ecologists at NCSU are attempting to show in their innovative new study, announced in late August. In places like urban apartments, Dunn is hoping to discover “a who’s who of evolutionary miracle stories.” He’s soliciting ten households from each state - 5 rural, 5 urban - to sample their houses and send the kits back for analysis. The team will then let you know what you’ve been living with, as well as post the results online (anonymously, don’t worry).

Want to get involved? Check out the project website. Hurry - first come, first served!

Source: Wired

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homedesigning:

House with spectacular downtown city views

homedesigning:

House with spectacular downtown city views

Source: home-designing.com

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sciencecenter:

What was in the air on 9/11?

When ten million of tons of building, mixed with 91,000 liters of jet fuel, collapse into a smoking heap, an incredible variety of pulverized materials rise into the air. Though no one took samples of the plume that rose up from the World Trade Center on 9/11, samples of the dust that filtered down in the following days and gas emanating from the pile have given a glimpse of what rescue workers and others breathed in: heavy metals from computers, cellulose from paper, shards of metal and stone from the buildings’ walls, calcium carbonate from the tons of smashed cement, fibers from rugs, fragments of glass and burned hair.
The NYC EPA’s conflicting reports in the days after the disaster—air pollution levels seemed safe, yet rescue workers should wear bulky respirators—appear to have contributed to the ongoing public health crisis of “World Trade Center cough,” lung disease, and increased cancer rates in rescuers and those who worked nearby.

sciencecenter:

What was in the air on 9/11?

When ten million of tons of building, mixed with 91,000 liters of jet fuel, collapse into a smoking heap, an incredible variety of pulverized materials rise into the air. Though no one took samples of the plume that rose up from the World Trade Center on 9/11, samples of the dust that filtered down in the following days and gas emanating from the pile have given a glimpse of what rescue workers and others breathed in: heavy metals from computers, cellulose from paper, shards of metal and stone from the buildings’ walls, calcium carbonate from the tons of smashed cement, fibers from rugs, fragments of glass and burned hair.

The NYC EPA’s conflicting reports in the days after the disaster—air pollution levels seemed safe, yet rescue workers should wear bulky respirators—appear to have contributed to the ongoing public health crisis of “World Trade Center cough,” lung disease, and increased cancer rates in rescuers and those who worked nearby.

Source: blogs.discovermagazine.com

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micasaessucasa:

Park City, Utah home

Source: micasaessucasa

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erickimberlinbowley:

The Loneliest Whale in the World.
In 2004, The New York Times wrote an article about the loneliest whale in the world. Scientists have been tracking her since 1992 and they discovered the problem:
She isn’t like any other baleen whale. Unlike all other whales, she doesn’t have friends. She doesn’t have a family. She doesn’t belong to any tribe, pack or gang. She doesn’t have a lover. She never had one. Her songs come in groups of two to six calls, lasting for five to six seconds each. But her voice is unlike any other baleen whale. It is unique—while the rest of her kind communicate between 12 and 25hz, she sings at 52hz. You see, that’s precisely the problem. No other whales can hear her. Every one of her desperate calls to communicate remains unanswered. Each cry ignored. And, with every lonely song, she becomes sadder and more frustrated, her notes going deeper in despair as the years go by.
Just imagine that massive mammal, floating alone and singing—too big to connect with any of the beings it passes, feeling paradoxically small in the vast stretches of empty, open ocean.

erickimberlinbowley:

The Loneliest Whale in the World.

In 2004, The New York Times wrote an article about the loneliest whale in the world. Scientists have been tracking her since 1992 and they discovered the problem:

She isn’t like any other baleen whale. Unlike all other whales, she doesn’t have friends. She doesn’t have a family. She doesn’t belong to any tribe, pack or gang. She doesn’t have a lover. She never had one. Her songs come in groups of two to six calls, lasting for five to six seconds each. But her voice is unlike any other baleen whale. It is unique—while the rest of her kind communicate between 12 and 25hz, she sings at 52hz. You see, that’s precisely the problem. No other whales can hear her. Every one of her desperate calls to communicate remains unanswered. Each cry ignored. And, with every lonely song, she becomes sadder and more frustrated, her notes going deeper in despair as the years go by.

Just imagine that massive mammal, floating alone and singing—too big to connect with any of the beings it passes, feeling paradoxically small in the vast stretches of empty, open ocean.

Source: erickimberlinbowley

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secondnaturekitchens:

Avant Ebony @ Second Nature Collection

secondnaturekitchens:

Avant Ebony @ Second Nature Collection

(via micasaessucasa)

Source: sncollection.co.uk

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fuckyeahexoticlife:

bonfire :]

fuckyeahexoticlife:

bonfire :]

(via homedesigning)

Source: laughloudloveforever

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micasaessucasa:

(via Nature Funneled Inside Sleek Fortress House | The Beautifulist)

micasaessucasa:

(via Nature Funneled Inside Sleek Fortress House | The Beautifulist)

Source: thebeautifulist.com

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Shared Kids' Rooms

i wish i had rooms like these…

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kabocha-yellowskin:

OMFG

kabocha-yellowskin:

OMFG

(via amorningcupofjo)

Source: i-heart-baking.blogspot.com

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